Author: RS Queen

The Importance of Insulin Sensitivity

Insulin Resistance Cycle

When we are young, our metabolism is very flexible and responds quickly to changes in blood glucose. Our tissues are very sensitive to insulin and respond quickly – called insulin sensitivity. When blood glucose levels start to rise, the pancreas releases insulin, which helps to transport the sugar into muscle and tissues, where it is Read More …

Raw Banana Starch – Yes or No?

Green bananas are rich in resistant starch

Raw Banana Flour is now being promoted as a natural source of resistant starch. At first glance, it seems to be an ideal ingredient for supplementation. Maybe, maybe not… There are a few caveats to consider: 1.  Under-ripe bananas are an excellent source of resistant starch, but as the bananas ripen, the starch naturally converts Read More …

Sitagliptin Synergy

Nutrient and Drug are Synergistic

Mike Keenan at Louisiana State University just published his 15th animal study with RS2 resistant starch from high amylose corn. Surprisingly, it was sponsored by Merck and examined the potential synergism between Merck’s drug Januvia® (sitagliptin) and resistant starch. Both impact GLP-1 in the gut, but by different mechanisms. Sitagliptin inhibits the breakdown of GLP-1 Read More …

The Microbiome and Resistant Starch

Resistant starch and the microbiome

Over the past decade, there has been a growing awareness that the bacteria and other organisms that live in our gut —called the microbiome— are important. In addition to diet and exercise, certain gut bacteria are correlated with, and potentially contribute to, numerous health conditions. What we eat significantly changes the composition of the microbiome, Read More …

South African Diet Swap

South African Diet Swap Food Picture

Many studies over the year have examined the resistant starch and dietary fiber consumed in Africa. The first comparison was by Burkett and Trowell, who hypothesized that dietary fiber may be responsible for the fact that Africans have significantly reduced risk of cancer than populations eating a Westernized diet.  This was called the “Fiber Gap”.  Read More …